philamuseum:

Sign up for our Art and Science course, which explores the interconnected histories of those two topics in the Western world, from ancient Greek architecture, to Renaissance perspective, to today’s advanced data-visualization techniques.
“Perspective Drawing for ‘The Pair-Oared Shell,' ” 1872, by Thomas Eakins

philamuseum:

Sign up for our Art and Science course, which explores the interconnected histories of those two topics in the Western world, from ancient Greek architecture, to Renaissance perspective, to today’s advanced data-visualization techniques.


Perspective Drawing for ‘The Pair-Oared Shell,' ” 1872, by Thomas Eakins

Today in beautiful book covers (Earth Day edition): Rachel Carson’s The Edge of the Sea (1956).


To understand the shore, it is not enough to catalogue its life. Understanding comes only when, standing on a beach, we can sense the long rhythms of earth and sea that sculptured its land forms and produced the rock and sand of which it is composed; when we can sense with the eye and ear of the mind the surge of life beating always at its shores—blindly, inexorably pressing for a foothold.

Tumblr: the 24-hour archive

othmeralia:

Check out this awesome blog post that highlights some of the archival institutions in the Delaware Valley using Tumblr: 

Flat Tires and Engine Misfires (AACA Library & Research Center)

Freawaru (Free Library of Philadelphia)

The Hagley Vault (Hagley Museum and Library)

HSPDigitalLibrary (Historical Society of Pennsylvania) 

Ismarchives (Independence Seaport Museum)

New York World’s Fair Collections (Museum of the City of New York and Queens Museum)

Oh and that Othmeralia blog is also mentioned. :-)

Hey, that’s us! If you like Mid-Atlantic history, go follow those other tumblrs, too.

What, your reading room doesn’t have ships? 
(That’s our steel plating half mold of the WWII oil tanker, the USS Cimarron, built by Sun Shipbuilding in Chester, PA.)
Reading room shelfie for National Library Week. Thank a librarian today!

americanguide:

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

  1. Boot Bar lettering.
  2. Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
  3. Dodge lettering. 
  4. Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
  5. King of Jeans lettering.
  6. A Man’s Image lettering. 
  7. Melino’s lettering. 
  8. Texas Weiners lettering.
  9. Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
  10. DEERE lettering. 

* * *

Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.

(via hspdigitallibrary)

Today in beautiful book covers…
 This is an 1881 account of the journey explorer Frederick Schwatka made in 1878 on behalf of the American Geographical Society. The AGS tasked Schwatka and his team (which included Gilder) to find records and evidence of Sir John Franklin’s arctic expedition that left England in 1845 and failed to return.

Today in beautiful book covers…

 This is an 1881 account of the journey explorer Frederick Schwatka made in 1878 on behalf of the American Geographical Society. The AGS tasked Schwatka and his team (which included Gilder) to find records and evidence of Sir John Franklin’s arctic expedition that left England in 1845 and failed to return.

Beautiful initial letter on this shipping receipt from 1715, for goods transported from Philadelphia to Jamaica aboard the sloop, Mary.  
Thomas Lediard being adored by the nautical arts. (From his The Naval History of England in all its branches, from the Norman Conquest … to the conclusion of 1734, published in 1735.)
The Independence Seaport Museum archives and curatorial staff would like it to be known that henceforth all of our staff photos will look like this.

Thomas Lediard being adored by the nautical arts. (From his The Naval History of England in all its branches, from the Norman Conquest … to the conclusion of 1734, published in 1735.)

The Independence Seaport Museum archives and curatorial staff would like it to be known that henceforth all of our staff photos will look like this.

Tattoo time aboard the USS Olympia! (circa 1898)
From an album of photographs taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston and others aboard USFS Olympia, compiled by Benjamin Franklin Littlejohn around 1898. The collection also includes clippings, ephemera, and a volume in which Littlejohn wrote a brief narrative of his life, dated 1954.
historicaltimes:

RMS Titanic presents an impressive silhouette from the starboard side, April 1912

historicaltimes:

RMS Titanic presents an impressive silhouette from the starboard side, April 1912

livelymorgue:

May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times

hspdigitallibrary:

Doodles by William Begg, a sailor on the ship Tenedos, who kept this log during his stint in the Naval battles of the War of 1812. Apparently, he was trying to learn anatomy in his down time!

Check out the rest of Begg’s “illustrated” journal here on our Digital Library.

Doesn’t look very electric to me.
[If you’re interested in learning more about the Audels books, this wikipedia page isn’t a terrible place to start. The volume pictured above is a 1941 reprint.]

Doesn’t look very electric to me.

[If you’re interested in learning more about the Audels books, this wikipedia page isn’t a terrible place to start. The volume pictured above is a 1941 reprint.]

uispeccoll:

Pleased to announce our newest book arts acquisition: 

The Deep by Kevin Steele.


From the artist’s website:  

"The Deep is a tribute to maritime folklore and tradition developed over centuries of nautical exploration. The ocean, which remains immense and mysterious in our own time, was all the more enchanting and terrifying to sailors in an era when being at sea meant a profound isolation from civilization in oft uncharted waters and dangerous passages.


The Deep is a circular accordion pop-up book which unfolds to an oversized eight-point compass rose. The compass, arguably the sailor’s most valuable instrument, not only enables accurate navigation but brings good luck, ensuring safe passage home and protecting against a watery end in the Deep.”

Visit the artist’s website.

If you want to take a look in person just stop by the desk in our reading room and our librarians will  probably offer a bit of assistance.  I particularly recommend getting a group together and stopping by since it is a great one to gather around. 

This is fantastic.

historicaltimes:

A mascot provides support aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort, 1918

historicaltimes:

A mascot provides support aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort, 1918